Going to Orlando and its Parks

It’s time to make a journey and the destination this time is called Orlando, a space full of fun that attracts millions of people during the whole year due to it’s famous parks, places like Disney World, Universal Studio or the Cabo Discovery will keep you busy all day long. Start by looking for a More »

Helsinki City Guide

Helsinki, recently awarded as ‘City of Design’ by UNESCO, is the capital of Finland. Unlike the Nordic winter, the temperature of this city is quite livable, and life continues throughout the year. It has four seasons, and the temperatures vary from 32 degrees in the summer and about -20 degrees in the winter. With the More »

Tricking Out Your Jeep

Tricking out your Jeep is easier than you might think. No matter your budget, there are a number of accessories and parts that you can purchase to trick out your Jeep the way you want it. From roof racks such as the Jeep jk roof rack, lighting, flares, engines, etc. you can have the Jeep More »

Tag Archives: activ travel

Top 5 golfing vacation destinations

As the PGA Tour island hops from Maui to Oahu this week, the Golf Guy and Birdie Bailey decided it was an appropriate time to bust out their picks for their top-5 dream golfing destinations. Feel free to add your thoughts on where YOU dream of playing.

The Golf Guy

Maui, Hawaii: Wailea to be exact. The Blue Course, the Emerald Course and the Gold Course. Three fun layouts, each with stunning views of the Pacific Ocean and some of the nearby islands. And I’ve never witnessed more beautiful shades of green in my entire life. My favorite part? Playing late in the afternoon with the setting sun, and realizing some cocktails and a steak are waiting after the round in the clubhouse, where you can talk about this may have been the greatest day of your life.

Cape Kidnappers (New Zealand, pictured above): Never been there. Good chance I’ll never get there. But just seeing a picture of that golf course makes me think that it is has to be the home course of the golfing gods.

Whistling Straits (Kohler, Wisc.): Strange as this may sound, I have mixed feelings when I think of my trip last year to Whistling Straits. I played all three course in the area – Blackwolf Run (the fairways are in better shape than most greens), the Irish Course (incredible, perfectly-framed course standing on the tee), and the Straits Course (pretty sure what filmmaker Tim Burton would have in mind if he ever designed a golf course). Where do the “mixed feelings” come from? I had to go to the hospital (no joke) after playing the Straits Course. No carts allowed. Walking mandatory. Bring muscle relaxers.

Cypress Point (Pebble Beach, Calif.): Aerial views of the famed par-3 16th are awesome (Google it). The rugged coastline around the hole looks like pre-historic times, the crashing waves are awe-inspiring … and it’s a par-3. That means, I could somehow get a green in regulation on one of the world’s greatest golf holes. Only one problem: It’s is a very exclusive club. Not likely to see ‘Golf Guy’ on the tee times sheet … ever.

Anywhere, Ireland: Again, never been there … yet. Do I want to play in the wind, cold and rain? No. Do I want to at least set out to play in horrible conditions knowing full well that I can quit at any time and instead head back into a pub and try to decipher crazy Irish talk? Absolutely.


Birdie Bailey

Monterey, Calif.: Pebble Beach is as amazing as its reputation suggests. And yes, Cypress Point is even more spectacular and breathtaking. Throw in a few other rounds at Spyglass, Poppy Hills or Monterey Peninsula Country Club and have yourself a bowl – or ten – of clam chowder from the Old Fisherman’s Grotto on the wharf and I can’t say it gets any more heavenly than that.

Long Island, N.Y.: Bethpage, Shinnecock, Long Island National and a slew of other courses crowd the populated state and I imagine any of them would be one of the best courses I’ve ever played. I’ve never been, but would love to see grown men sleeping in their cars overnight just to be one of the first in line to tee up at Bethpage.

Bandon, Oregon: Rumor has it that Bandon is home to some of the most beautiful, links-style courses on the western coast. With four courses to choose from – Bandon Dunes, Pacific Dunes, Bandon Trails and Old Macdonald – I’d be lucky to play just one, let alone all four.

Scottsdale, Ariz.: Call me biased, call me partial. I spent three years in the Phoenix/Scottsdale area playing golf and writing about it, and it was nearly the perfect job. A few of my favorites include Quintero, We-Ko-Pa, Southern Dunes, Estancia, Grayhawk and DC Ranch, but you can hardly go wrong anywhere you play. Throw in a good margarita, guacamole and some short rib tacos and call me a happy clam.

St. Andrews: I surmise St. Andrews is on every golfer’s list of dream destinations, so I don’t have to explain myself on this one. Seeing the birthplace of golf and soaking in the history? I’ll get there one day.

Lack of snow limits snowmobiles in Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park will open for the winter season on Thursday but a lack of snow will limit where snowmobiles can go for now.

Commercially-guided snowmobiles or snowcoaches will only be allowed to travel between the park’s South Entrance and Old Faithful.

Park officials say roads in the rest of the park have too much snow and ice for regular vehicles but not enough for snowmobiles or snowcoaches.

Commercial snowmobile and snowcoach operators will be able to use snowcoaches or regular vehicles to transport visitors from West Yellowstone and Mammoth Hot Springs to Old Faithful. Snowcoaches can also travel between Norris and Canyon.

Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Travel photo of the day: Great Smoky Mountain sunset

Peter McIntosh / UGC

Peter McIntosh captured this sunset image in the Great Smoky National Park last spring.

Peter McIntosh of Clayton, Ga., captured this incredible image while visiting Great Smoky Mountains National Park last spring.

Clayton said he and “a zillion” other photographers were perched atop an observatory at Clingmans Dome – the park’s highest point – at sunset.

Sunset shots are popular from that vantage point. “It was like kickoff at the Super Bowl with all those flashes going off,” McIntosh said.

If his work looks familiar, it’s likely because you’ve seen it before – we featured McIntosh’s stunning photo of a lightning strike last week.

You can see more of his photography at his website.

Do you have some photos you want to share? Submit them for a chance to be featured in our weekly It’s a Snap gallery by clicking here. While there, vote for your favorite shot.

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Swiss resorts in uphill battle over no snow, franc

Armed with snow canons and cut-price hotel deals some of Switzerland’s ski resorts, already beleaguered by the strong Swiss franc, are grappling with another obstacle — no snow.


    1. Image: Motorcycle illustration


      Thinking road trip? Tap into your wild side


      Traveling by motorcycle is as much fun as you can imagine. Renting one takes effort.


    2. Universities with the finest eats


    3. Smithsonian showcases ‘Jet as Art’


    4. Pairing fine wines with fine barbecue


    5. Booked for one night, but charged for two

A dry November has forced several ski resorts to push back the start of the season, the latest in a string of bad news for hoteliers who have struggled to fill beds as the soaring Swiss franc deters foreign holidaymakers.

Not to be disheartened, Davos-Klosters nestled in eastern Switzerland employed no less than 250 snow canons to get pistes ready for the season start — a week later than scheduled.

Some 3,000 winter sport enthusiasts trekked to the resort lying 1,560 meters (yards) above sea level last weekend to slide down the 6 km (3.728 miles) of pistes made from artificial snow, long white stretches on an otherwise brown and green landscape.

Despite the delayed start, Yves Bugmann, finance director of Davos-Klosters mountain railway, remained unperturbed for now.

“Financially, the losses so far are marginal and can be recouped through cost cuts,” he said. “Even so, a good start is the basis for a successful season.”

Tourism, which contributes some 5 percent to Swiss gross domestic product, has come under pressure due to the strong Swiss franc that rose by more than 20 percent against the euro earlier this year and flirted with parity in August — the height of the summer season.

Although the Swiss National Bank set a cap of 1.20 francs to the euro on September 6, many hoteliers still regard the currency as overvalued and say the tourist sector needs a good winter to stave off job cuts.

Veronique Kanel, spokeswoman for the Swiss tourism organization, said there was no cause for alarm yet.

“However, should this situation last until mid-December, the lack of snow coupled with the strong Swiss franc would be extremely worrying,” she said.

Switzerland had its last heavy snowfall on October 19, but the Federal Office for Meteorology is forecasting snow Friday evening, ending a five-week drought.

FRANC-FIGHTING MEASURES

Overnight stays from foreign visitors are forecast to drop 4.2 percent this winter, according to economic research institute BAKBASEL, with tourists from eastern Europe and the United States in particular seen shunning the Swiss Alps for cheaper destinations.

To lure price-conscious skiers and stop locals from straying to slopes over the border, Davos is offering free lift passes to those who book an overnight stay between now and Christmas.

This is just one initiative as part of the project ‘Franc-ly Switzerland’ run by the tourist board, which aims to sell the country, a favorite winter haunt of the rich and royalty, as an affordable destination.

Other measures include 10 percent off ski holidays, 2-for-1 lift passes, as well as discounted ski lessons and ski hire.

Hotel Grichting Badnerhof in Leukerbad in southwest Switzerland is offering guests an exchange rate of 1.40 francs to the euro, a discount of some 14 percent over Tuesday’s euro-Swiss exchange rate of 1.2289.

While this can help take up the slack during low-seasons, cutting prices is not a viable option in the long run, Kanel said. Still, some higher resorts blessed with snow have managed to make light of the situation.

Boasting snow-capped peaks, Saas Fee in southwestern Switzerland poked fun at snow-poorer resorts in a video showing winter sports fans attempting to ski and sledge and on grassy fields.

“We regret that snow enthusiasts are forced to carry out such questionable activities and invite you to enjoy the start of the winter season with us,” Saas Fee said in a mock news video.

Copyright 2011 Thomson Reuters. Click for restrictions.

Swiss resorts in uphill battle over no snow, franc

Armed with snow canons and cut-price hotel deals some of Switzerland’s ski resorts, already beleaguered by the strong Swiss franc, are grappling with another obstacle — no snow.


    1. Image: Motorcycle illustration


      Thinking road trip? Tap into your wild side


      Traveling by motorcycle is as much fun as you can imagine. Renting one takes effort.


    2. Universities with the finest eats


    3. Smithsonian showcases ‘Jet as Art’


    4. Pairing fine wines with fine barbecue


    5. Booked for one night, but charged for two

A dry November has forced several ski resorts to push back the start of the season, the latest in a string of bad news for hoteliers who have struggled to fill beds as the soaring Swiss franc deters foreign holidaymakers.

Not to be disheartened, Davos-Klosters nestled in eastern Switzerland employed no less than 250 snow canons to get pistes ready for the season start — a week later than scheduled.

Some 3,000 winter sport enthusiasts trekked to the resort lying 1,560 meters (yards) above sea level last weekend to slide down the 6 km (3.728 miles) of pistes made from artificial snow, long white stretches on an otherwise brown and green landscape.

Despite the delayed start, Yves Bugmann, finance director of Davos-Klosters mountain railway, remained unperturbed for now.

“Financially, the losses so far are marginal and can be recouped through cost cuts,” he said. “Even so, a good start is the basis for a successful season.”

Tourism, which contributes some 5 percent to Swiss gross domestic product, has come under pressure due to the strong Swiss franc that rose by more than 20 percent against the euro earlier this year and flirted with parity in August — the height of the summer season.

Although the Swiss National Bank set a cap of 1.20 francs to the euro on September 6, many hoteliers still regard the currency as overvalued and say the tourist sector needs a good winter to stave off job cuts.

Veronique Kanel, spokeswoman for the Swiss tourism organization, said there was no cause for alarm yet.

“However, should this situation last until mid-December, the lack of snow coupled with the strong Swiss franc would be extremely worrying,” she said.

Switzerland had its last heavy snowfall on October 19, but the Federal Office for Meteorology is forecasting snow Friday evening, ending a five-week drought.

FRANC-FIGHTING MEASURES

Overnight stays from foreign visitors are forecast to drop 4.2 percent this winter, according to economic research institute BAKBASEL, with tourists from eastern Europe and the United States in particular seen shunning the Swiss Alps for cheaper destinations.

To lure price-conscious skiers and stop locals from straying to slopes over the border, Davos is offering free lift passes to those who book an overnight stay between now and Christmas.

This is just one initiative as part of the project ‘Franc-ly Switzerland’ run by the tourist board, which aims to sell the country, a favorite winter haunt of the rich and royalty, as an affordable destination.

Other measures include 10 percent off ski holidays, 2-for-1 lift passes, as well as discounted ski lessons and ski hire.

Hotel Grichting Badnerhof in Leukerbad in southwest Switzerland is offering guests an exchange rate of 1.40 francs to the euro, a discount of some 14 percent over Tuesday’s euro-Swiss exchange rate of 1.2289.

While this can help take up the slack during low-seasons, cutting prices is not a viable option in the long run, Kanel said. Still, some higher resorts blessed with snow have managed to make light of the situation.

Boasting snow-capped peaks, Saas Fee in southwestern Switzerland poked fun at snow-poorer resorts in a video showing winter sports fans attempting to ski and sledge and on grassy fields.

“We regret that snow enthusiasts are forced to carry out such questionable activities and invite you to enjoy the start of the winter season with us,” Saas Fee said in a mock news video.

Copyright 2011 Thomson Reuters. Click for restrictions.